Loading…
This event has ended. Visit the official site or create your own event on Sched.

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Thursday, August 12
 

8:00am PDT

Registration and Badge Pick-Up
Thursday August 12, 2021 8:00am - 9:00am PDT
Luskin

8:40am PDT

Opening Remarks and Poster Previews
Thursday August 12, 2021 8:40am - 8:55am PDT
Luskin

8:55am PDT

Break: 5 minutes
Thursday August 12, 2021 8:55am - 9:00am PDT
Break

9:00am PDT

Desirable Difficulties: Using Hormesis to Learn More Effectively
The internet and digital devices have broadened access to information. But have they improved our ability to learn and comprehend?  Paradoxically, the very ease of digital information technology can make it harder for us to retain information and learn new skills.

In previous talks I’ve discussed how hormesis -- the judicious application of beneficial stress -- can improve health. Can hormesis also be applied to enhance learning? There is evidence that making learning more challenging in specific ways can make it more effective. This talk will draw upon research in educational psychology and investigations of memory systems used by pre-modern cultures to demonstrate how you can better retain what you read, hear and watch. Hormesis can also help you master nonverbal skills in areas as diverse as music, design and athletics.

Speakers
avatar for Todd Becker

Todd Becker

M.S.
Todd Becker is the author of Getting Stronger, a popular blog that addresses a wide range of health topics through the lens of hormesis, the beneficial application of low dose stress. Todd spoke at AHS in 2013 on the downside of nutritional supplements, and in 2014 on natural myopia... Read More →


Thursday August 12, 2021 9:00am - 9:40am PDT
Luskin

9:40am PDT

Break: 10 minutes
Thursday August 12, 2021 9:40am - 9:50am PDT
Break

9:50am PDT

Ancestral diets and bone health
Bone mass generally increases for the first 2-3 decades of life, and then steadily declines. There are many factors that can influence bone mass, but many of them – e.g. age, gender, genetics – are not modifiable. Modifiable factors include diet and exercise, as well as some medications. In this talk, I will discuss factors present in various ancestral diets that can either improve or worsen bone health.

Speakers
avatar for Lynda Frassetto

Lynda Frassetto

M.D.
Lynda Frassetto, MD, is a Professor of Medicine in the Division of Nephrology at the University of California, San Francisco (USCF). She teaches and supervises both inpatient and outpatient nephrology at the University and the Veteran’s Administration hospitals. She has been doing... Read More →


Thursday August 12, 2021 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Luskin

10:30am PDT

Break: 10 minutes
Thursday August 12, 2021 10:30am - 10:40am PDT
Break

10:40am PDT

Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art
We breathe about 25,000 times a day, and yet so few of us are doing it well. What went wrong? Journalist and author James Nestor explores how the human species has lost the ability to breathe properly and why we’re suffering from a laundry list of maladies because of it.

Speakers
avatar for James Nestor

James Nestor

James Nestor is an author and journalist who has written for Scientific American, Outside, The New York Times, and more. His latest book, Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art, was released May 26, 2020 by Riverhead/Penguin Random House and was an instant New York Times and London... Read More →


Thursday August 12, 2021 10:40am - 11:20am PDT
Luskin

11:20am PDT

Break: 10 minutes
Thursday August 12, 2021 11:20am - 11:30am PDT
Break

11:30am PDT

Incretins and the Evolution of the GI Tract
A few decades ago researchers discovered the incretin effect when they compared the insulin response to equal amounts of glucose provided either via IV infusion or orally.  Oral consumption of glucose generated a 50% to 70% greater insulin response as compared to IV glucose, a phenomenon called the incretin effect and now known to be driven by peptides (called incretins) released from the enteric cells in response to food intake. It has been shown that the majority of the insulin response to carbohydrate consumption is a function of the type of processing the particular carbohydrate has undergone.  Unprocessed or lightly processed carbohydrate foods stimulate a much lower insulin response than do the same carbohydrate amount that has been highly processed.  Although the incretin effect does occur with protein and fat consumption, it does so to a much smaller degree.  The carbohydrate content of the current American diet has recently reached similar levels to that of the first measured America diet circa 1900, yet thanks to the incretin effect, the highly-processed carbohydrate content of the current America diet stimulates vastly more insulin than did the diet of a century ago. Since insulin is the major metabolic hormone stimulating fat storage, the excess insulin driven by the incretin effect, in turn driven by the highly processed nature of the current American diet, can help explain the obesity epidemic much better than simply the macronutrient composition. The incretin effect also explains how bariatric surgery reverses diabetes so quickly and why the GLP-1 (an incretin) agonists work as anti-hyperglycemic agents.  

Speakers
avatar for Michael Eades

Michael Eades

M.D.
Dr. Eades was born in Springfield, Missouri and educated in Missouri, Michigan, and California. He received his undergraduate degree in engineering from California State Polytechnic University, and received his medical degree from the University of Arkansas. After completing his medical... Read More →


Thursday August 12, 2021 11:30am - 12:10pm PDT
Luskin

12:10pm PDT

Lunch
Thursday August 12, 2021 12:10pm - 1:40pm PDT
Break

1:40pm PDT

Ancestral health and the reversal of cognitive decline
Research over the past several decades has led to a model of Alzheimer's disease as a network insufficiency that is often the result of a protective response to specific insults. Four major groups of contributors lead to this insufficiency: inflammation, toxins, energy reduction, and trophic reduction. Ancestral health impacts all of these groups. Identifying and targeting the contributors for each patient has led to the first reversals of cognitive decline in patients with Alzheimer's and pre-Alzheimer's, and a recent clinical trial supports this therapeutic approach.

Speakers
avatar for Dale Bredesen

Dale Bredesen

M.D.
Dr. Bredesen graduated from Caltech and received his MD from Duke. He served as Resident and Chief Resident in Neurology at UCSF, then was postdoctoral fellow with Nobel laureate Prof. Stanley Prusiner. He was the Founding President of the Buck Institute for Research on Aging. The... Read More →


Thursday August 12, 2021 1:40pm - 2:20pm PDT
Luskin

2:20pm PDT

Break: 10 minutes
Thursday August 12, 2021 2:20pm - 2:30pm PDT
Break

2:30pm PDT

Omega-6 Apocalypse 2: Are Seed Oil Excesses the Unifying Mechanism for Overweight and Virtually All Chronic Disease?
Over the past 150 years, we’ve witnessed the evolution of pandemics of chronic degenerative, metabolic, and noncommunicable disease (NCD). Ample evidence supports the conclusion that coronary heart disease, cancers, metabolic disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and many other chronic diseases have risen from medical rarity to the most common causes of chronic disease and death. During this same time frame, we’ve witnessed industrially produced seed oils, rich in omega-6 fatty acids, elevate to occupy up to one-fourth to one-third of human consumption, or more. Such oils rarely existed anywhere prior to the American Civil War, globally. Virtually all chronic degenerative diseases have in common one primary metabolic defect, namely, mitochondrial dysfunction. Seed oil and high omega-6 is a known driver of mitochondrial dysfunction, as evidenced in many studies. Furthermore, an examination of food consumption patterns in many nations strongly indicates that seed oils are by far the greatest factor in such chronic disease. An examination of food consumption in Japan leads to no other obvious conclusion. Could omega-6 rich seed oils, consumed to excess, be the common precipitating factor for most all chronic disease, via multiple mechanisms, including the fact that they are pro-oxidative, proinflammatory, cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, atherogenic, thrombogenic, and obesogenic? The evidence is compelling.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Knobbe

Chris Knobbe

M.D.
Chris Knobbe, MD is an ophthalmologist and Associate Clinical Professor Emeritus, formerly of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Knobbe has a deep interest in general nutrition, particularly as it relates to chronic degenerative disease, though... Read More →


Thursday August 12, 2021 2:30pm - 3:10pm PDT
Luskin

3:10pm PDT

Break: 20 minutes
Thursday August 12, 2021 3:10pm - 3:30pm PDT
Break

3:30pm PDT

The Pursuit of Health Through Heritage — Exploring A Diet Rooted in African Traditions for Optimal Health
Diet plays an essential role in human development and growth, contributing to health and well-being. While an ancestral diet has been shown to be beneficial, culturally specific dietary guidelines have yet to be presented. The central question addressed in this overview presentation is whether the eating patterns of African American ancestors are best for those of African descent. The studies on diet patterns of the African diaspora inform the discussion. Healthy or prudent, as opposed to Western, eating patterns are identified in groups of African origin. It appears that a different group of foods predict diet quality and health outcomes in a 2-year anecdotal experiment. A diet was followed that was based on staples from the African diaspora and promoted greens, beans and peas, whole grains, fruits, peanuts and nuts, vegetables, tubers as well as fish as the main source of protein.

Speakers
avatar for Orleatha Smith

Orleatha Smith

M.Ed.
Orleatha holds an advanced degree in education, a biology teaching credential, and is a certified holistic lifestyle coach. She has also been featured in popular publications such as First For Women Magazine, The Los Angeles Times, and has had appearances on various television sh... Read More →


Thursday August 12, 2021 3:30pm - 4:10pm PDT
Luskin

4:10pm PDT

Break: 10 minutes
Thursday August 12, 2021 4:10pm - 4:20pm PDT
Break

4:20pm PDT

The Hidden Health Epidemic & Worldwide Killer (That YOU Have The Power To Fix)
Imagine a condition that makes a person irritable, depressed, and self-centered, and also increases their risk of dying early by over 25%. Imagine that in industrialized countries, over 30% of folks are afflicted with this condition. Your income doesn’t protect you. Nor does your education, your sex, or your ethnicity. Worse yet, the condition is considered to be contagious, damages heart muscle, causes premature death and can affect any ordinary person walking down the street.  This condition exists, and it’s called “loneliness”. Also known as social isolation, loneliness is often stigmatized, trivialized, and flat-out ignored, but is fast emerging as a worldwide public health problem – oddly enough growing hand-in-hand with so-called “social” media. Turns out, there is a fascinating link between love, family, social connectedness and relationships, and a longer lifespan. This presentation by Ben will give a host of practical love tips to include in one’s life for a longer lifespan and better health. After all, owning an amazing body and a sharp mind can all be for naught if loneliness, sadness, inflammation, high blood pressure and accelerated aging are all occurring due to a lack of friendships, social relationships, community, charity and love – and in this presentation, Ben will teach exactly why to and how to include these important components into a body, mind and spirit routine.



Speakers
avatar for Ben Greenfield

Ben Greenfield

M.A.
Ben Greenfield is an ex-bodybuilder, Ironman triathlete, obstacle course racer, human performance consultant, speaker and author of 13 books, including the New York Times Bestseller “Beyond Training”. Ben has been voted by the NSCA as America’s top Personal Trainer and by Greatist... Read More →


Thursday August 12, 2021 4:20pm - 5:00pm PDT
Luskin

5:30pm PDT

Welcome Dinner
For those who purchased a ticket, the Welcome Dinner, on Thursday, August 12, begins with a reception on the Luskin Center’s Centennial Terrace at 5:30 p.m.  A buffet dinner will be served beginning at 6:00 p.m.

Thursday August 12, 2021 5:30pm - 8:00pm PDT
Luskin Center’s Centennial Terrace
 
Friday, August 13
 

9:00am PDT

Energy Management: The Common Theme in Ancestral Health and Evolutionary Medicine
Over the years, the Ancestral Health Symposium has encompassed an extremely diverse range of topics including nutrition, physical fitness, postural alignment, brain health, hormonal regulation, orthodontics, infant care practices, sexuality, regenerative agriculture, and more. In our goal to reduce the mismatches between our bodies’ and brains’ evolutionary programming and the modern environments with which they are confronted, it may be helpful to understand that the common theme linking all of these subjects is how energy management adaptations shaped human (and non-human) anatomy, physiology, psychology, and behavior. Join us for a review of some of the Ancestral Health Symposium’s greatest hits (and a few from the sister conference of Physicians for Ancestral Health) to see how this common thread can help unify our approaches to practicing evolutionary medicine, creating societal harmony, and maintaining planetary sustainability.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Welch

Stephanie Welch

M.A.
Stephanie Welch has been an ancestral health advocate since 2010. Her penchant for disruptive anthropology has led her to investigate and challenge many commonly held beliefs and taboos about being a modern human. In addition to the original paleo focus on how to determine what constitutes... Read More →


Friday August 13, 2021 9:00am - 9:40am PDT
Luskin

9:40am PDT

Break: 10 minutes
Friday August 13, 2021 9:40am - 9:50am PDT
Break

9:50am PDT

What are the ethical implications of anti-meat dietary policies?
The past decade has seen a rapidly growing movement towards a cleaner, healthier and sustainable way of eating. However, the mainstream global dialogue is focused on the reduction and eventual elimination of animal-sourced foods. There is growing concern among many citizens, scientists, academics and food producers who share a belief that we need to preserve a true range of food options to reflect the diversity of our cultures, races, and traditions and importantly, our degree of metabolic health. Maintaining diversity and choice are at the foundation of any healthy democracy, and health itself is a human right. Diana’s new initiative, the Global Food Justice Alliance, advocates for a concept called Food Sovereignty, which is the right of peoples to healthy and culturally appropriate food produced through ecologically sound and sustainable methods, and their right to define their own food and agriculture systems. It puts the aspirations and needs of those who produce, distribute and consume food at the heart of food systems and policies rather than the demands of markets and corporations.

Speakers
avatar for Diana Rodgers

Diana Rodgers

RD, LDN
Diana Rodgers, RD, is a “real food” nutritionist and sustainability advocate near Boston, Massachusetts. She’s an author of three books, runs a clinical nutrition practice, hosts the Sustainable Dish Podcast, and is an advisory board member of Animal Welfare Approved and Savory... Read More →


Friday August 13, 2021 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Luskin

10:30am PDT

Break: 30 minutes
Friday August 13, 2021 10:30am - 11:00am PDT
Break

10:30am PDT

Barefoot stroll around campus
Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Welch

Stephanie Welch

M.A.
Stephanie Welch has been an ancestral health advocate since 2010. Her penchant for disruptive anthropology has led her to investigate and challenge many commonly held beliefs and taboos about being a modern human. In addition to the original paleo focus on how to determine what constitutes... Read More →


Friday August 13, 2021 10:30am - 11:00am PDT
Meet outside Luskin

11:00am PDT

Rewilding the gut: what modern microbiome science can tell us about restoring ancestral diversity
The gut microbiota plays essential roles in human health and has been implicated in many chronic diseases. This dense community of microbes has co-evolved with its host over million years of evolution, but in recent decades has been substantially affected by modern industrialization. According to some estimates, we’ve lost about half of our ancestral microbial diversity. In this talk, I discuss the evidence for lost microbial diversity, the effects of diet on the industrialization of the gut microbiota, and the potential benefits for a “wilder” gut microbiome. I also review several studies that highlight potential strategies to “rewild” the gut, including the removal of processed foods, the inclusion of fiber or fermented foods, exercise, time spent in natural environments, social interaction, and fecal transplants.

Speakers
avatar for Lucy Mailing

Lucy Mailing

Ph.D.
Lucy Mailing, Ph.D. is a microbiome researcher, educator, and passionate scholar of integrative, evidence-based gut health. Lucy received her bachelor’s in biology from Kalamazoo College and her Ph.D. in Nutritional Sciences from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her... Read More →


Friday August 13, 2021 11:00am - 11:40am PDT
Luskin

11:40am PDT

Break: 10 minutes
Friday August 13, 2021 11:40am - 11:50am PDT
Break

11:50am PDT

Vitamin D and COVID-19
The decline in vitamin D status with indoor lifestyles is an example of the discordance hypothesis, wherein disease emerges because of the discordance between current and evolutionary environments. Vitamin D is a well-established immune factor and has a small but significant body of evidence favoring its usefulness in reducing the burden of upper respiratory tract infections, such as colds and flu. A large body of evidence emerged over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic suggesting that keeping vitamin D levels above 30 ng/mL might prevent most of the severity and mortality associated with the disease. However, some of those papers have had their authenticity questioned, and not every paper has arrived at the same conclusion. This presentation will review the literature to date on vitamin D and COVID-19 and provide an estimate of how protective it is and how confident we can be in its protection.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Masterjohn

Chris Masterjohn

Ph.D.
Chris earned his PhD in Nutritional Sciences from the University of Connecticut. He was also an Assistant Professor of Health and Nutrition Sciences at Brooklyn College. In the fall of 2016, he made the decision to leave academia and pursue entrepreneurship a transition he completed... Read More →


Friday August 13, 2021 11:50am - 12:30pm PDT
Luskin

12:30pm PDT

Lunch
Friday August 13, 2021 12:30pm - 2:30pm PDT
Break

2:30pm PDT

- Poster Session -
Friday August 13, 2021 2:30pm - 3:30pm PDT
Luskin

2:30pm PDT

Applying Ancestral Health Principles in Connective Tissue Disorders
Our bodies are dependent on connective tissue to literally hold us together. As the name implies, these tissues connect all of the structures in our bodies. The negative impact of Connective Tissue Disease (CTD) can be felt anywhere in the body and cause multiple systems to operate at a sub-optimal level, or to literally fall apart. Connective tissue is comprised of collagen and elastin, In CTD, these are inflamed, harming the proteins and the structures they connect. The incidence of CTD is on the rise. Direct changes in epigenetic marks seem to be responsible for this increase, so applying Ancestral Health principles to reverse this trend, as well decrease the burden of symptoms is imperative. We can find support for implementing many components of ancestral principles in the clinical literature, and also in the many people affected with CTD who are benefiting from this approach.

Speakers
avatar for Isabel Ramirez-Burnett

Isabel Ramirez-Burnett

CMHC
Isabel is a Master Certified Health Coach specializing in adults and seniors. She initially became a health coach to better understand how lifestyle changes could impact her own set of chronic conditions. After great success, she started working with individual clients and groups... Read More →


Friday August 13, 2021 2:30pm - 3:30pm PDT
Luskin

2:30pm PDT

Body mechanics of modern life and the development of complex chronic illness: An evolutionary perspective
The physical habits common to modern life diverge from those of our evolutionary past, removing us further from the body mechanics of our ancestors. We will explore how modern activities such as texting, tablet use, computer use, prolonged sitting, and others, can lead to non-optimal or even pathological mechanical loading on the human body. This, in turn, may contribute to the development of chronic illness. With a focus on craniospinal hydrodynamics and neural tension, we will explore several mechanical neurological conditions associated with chronic illness states, including craniocervical instability, tethered cord syndrome, Eagle’s syndrome, and intracranial pressure problems. Finally, we propose a model of how some complex chronic illnesses, such as chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis, may have a mechanical basis. We discuss medical interventions, both surgical and non-surgical, that have resulted in patient improvement in symptoms of fatigue, cognitive impairment, migraines, gastrointestinal disturbance, post-exertional malaise, muscle weakness, and others.

Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey Wood

Jeffrey Wood

M.A.
After solving his own case of myalgic encephalomyelitis in 2017, Jeff built and proposed a new model of the disease. Jeff's conceptual innovation has, in turn, led to improvements and remissions in people with an illness once considered unsolved and incurable.After regaining his health... Read More →


Friday August 13, 2021 2:30pm - 3:30pm PDT
Luskin

2:30pm PDT

Iron Deficiency: Our Hidden Health Crisis
The human costs of pain and suffering, life and work missed, and permanent health consequences
due to iron deficiency (ID) are high but rarely addressed. The most prevalent nutritional deficiency across the globe, ID can result in a myriad of common and often debilitating symptoms. Poor diet is the primary driver, with low absorption, GI dysfunction, blood loss, and heliophobia being frequently involved. Awareness
of this strikingly underdiagnosed condition and the need for early treatment are of great individual and societal importance.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Emerson

Lisa Emerson

Lisa is a canine health and genetics consultantwho shifted her focus to the human side when amysterious illness destroyed her quality oflife.  Unhelped by modern government-corporatemedicine, she had to decipher the solution to herproblem in order to recover her health.  She nowruns... Read More →


Friday August 13, 2021 2:30pm - 3:30pm PDT
Luskin

2:30pm PDT

Mercury: The Quintessential Anti-Nutrient
Many health conditions are mitigated by the nutrient density of ancestral diets. Routine mercury exposures — via dental amalgams, dietary fish, and certain vaccines, as well as in utero exposures to such sources — yield toxic effects for susceptible persons. Mercury blocks metabolic enzymes and promotes oxidative stress. At the molecular level, mercury binds the key functional group, thiol (sulfur; cysteine), as well as selenium, thereby creating a biochemical train wreck. Mercury can cause or contribute to most chronic illnesses including premature aging. A stored mercury burden is difficult to detect with standard laboratory methods. Mercury toxicity can be addressed with extra nutrition and a low-carb, high-fat, high-fiber diet, which can alleviate oxidative stress, repair cellular damage, push blocked enzymes, control high cortisol, improve insulin sensitivity, and maintain gut function during toxicant elimination.

Speakers
avatar for Kris Homme

Kris Homme

PE(ret.), MPP, MPH
Kris Homme is a retired engineer turned science writer who covers environmental toxicants. Her early-onset macular degeneration (which she attributes to her twelve mercury dental amalgams) has not precluded her from reading the scientific literature; her work is available on PubMed... Read More →


Friday August 13, 2021 2:30pm - 3:30pm PDT
Luskin

2:30pm PDT

Using Principles of Systems Thinking, Neuroplasticity, and Ancestral Health to Improve Outcomes for Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis Patients.
The renowned systems scientist and anthropologist Gregory Bateson once said, "The major problems in the world are the result of the difference between how nature works and the way people think." Indeed, the ever-increasing prevalence of chronic diseases that so characterize modern life epitomizes this discrepancy. Our company, IBDCoach (www.ibd.coach), applies principles of systems thinking, neuroplasticity, and ancestral health to bridge the discrepancy to support patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Our clients work to achieve long-lasting remission through immersive science education, community support, and a unique form of health coaching that emphasizes strategic patient-driven and patient-empowered actions. Incredible and humbling initial results from dozens of clients demonstrate: ameliorations in symptom and disease activity, reductions of inflammatory markers, lifelong friendships formed, and lives changed for the better. We hope to extrapolate the lessons learned from IBD to other chronic health conditions and human health more broadly.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Loftus

Amy Loftus

A Northern California native, Amy holds a B.A. in Biological Anthropology and an M.A. in Education from the University of California, Berkeley. At IBDCoach, Amy combines her dual background of teaching middle school science and building software at a Silicon Valley healthtech startup... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Kornfeld

Andrew Kornfeld

Andrew grew up exploring beautiful Northern California, but at age 16 he developed a serious case of Crohn’s Disease. Through extensive trial and error, Andrew developed a tailored and evidence-based protocol by which he achieved robust, lasting clinical remission from his IBD... Read More →


Friday August 13, 2021 2:30pm - 3:30pm PDT
Luskin

3:30pm PDT

Movement Session
Speakers
avatar for Steven Luibrand

Steven Luibrand

Steven is an educator and trainer based out of The San Francisco Bay Area who has accumulated over 10,000 hours of face to face time with students and trainees.  He's on a mission to inspire people to master their health and athleticism through deliberate daily practice.  He lives... Read More →


Friday August 13, 2021 3:30pm - 4:00pm PDT
Meet outside Luskin

4:00pm PDT

Film Screening - Raspando Coco
Official Trailer (English Subtitles) - vimeo.com/comidasquecuran."Raspando coco" (31 mins, 2018) An Ecuadorian anthropologist from Quito travels to the northernmost coastal province of Esmeraldas, Ecuador to gather stories told by Afro-Ecuadorian elders about the traditional uses of coconut in their local cuisine and medicine. The film immerses us in the streets, farms and kitchens of Afro-Ecuadorians in Esmeraldas and their struggle to preserve their traditions in the face of obsolete medical advice and the rising cost of their traditional foods. The film shows nearly forgotten traditional recipes and home remedies made by grandmothers from Esmeraldas, such as hot chocolate made with freshly squeezed coconut milk.

Speakers
avatar for Pilar Egüez Guevara

Pilar Egüez Guevara

Pilar Egüez Guevara, PhD is an Ecuadorian cultural anthropologist, writer and filmmaker, who specializes in food, culture, conflict and health. She is co-founder and director of Comidas que Curan, an independent education initiative and film distributor that blends ethnography... Read More →


Friday August 13, 2021 4:00pm - 4:40pm PDT
Luskin

4:40pm PDT

Sacred Cow Q&A
Speakers
avatar for James Connolly

James Connolly

James Connolly is an artist, chef, non-profit founder and documentary film producer with Archer Gray Productions. He co-founded The Bubble Foundation, a non-profit focused on issues of wellness and food insecurity in inner-city public schools. The documentary film production tea... Read More →
avatar for Diana Rodgers

Diana Rodgers

RD, LDN
Diana Rodgers, RD, is a “real food” nutritionist and sustainability advocate near Boston, Massachusetts. She’s an author of three books, runs a clinical nutrition practice, hosts the Sustainable Dish Podcast, and is an advisory board member of Animal Welfare Approved and Savory... Read More →


Friday August 13, 2021 4:40pm - 5:00pm PDT
Luskin
 
Saturday, August 14
 

9:00am PDT

From 'man the fat hunter' to a unified explanation of human prehistory and evolution
In AHS12 in Boston, I hypothesized that Paleolithic humans depended on acquiring fat prey due to their limited ability to metabolize protein to energy. In the next nine years, that simple hypothesis turned out to be the cornerstone of a unified explanation of human prehistory and evolution. That physiological limit and humans need to overcome it by consuming high quantities of fat can explain human's preference for large prey, the extinctions of large prey species, the unidirectional brain expansion during most of the human's evolution, and its volume decline towards the end of the Paleolithic. It can also explain the appearance of language, changes in stone tool cultures, the extinction of the Neandertal, agriculture's appearance, and other phenomena. In the lecture, I will draw the puzzle and explain how each piece connects to the other and how they all stem from overcoming the protein limit.

Speakers
avatar for Miki Ben-Dor

Miki Ben-Dor

Ph.D.
Miki Ben-Dor has a PhD from the Department of Archaeology of the University of Tel Aviv. He has a BA in Economics and an MBA. During the last 12 years he has researched the dietary context of human evolution. Miki has a blog in English (paleostyle.com) and Hebrew (paleostyle.co.i... Read More →


Saturday August 14, 2021 9:00am - 9:40am PDT
Luskin

9:40am PDT

Break: 10 minutes
Saturday August 14, 2021 9:40am - 9:50am PDT
Break

9:50am PDT

Brains and Bugs: Infections and Historical Impact on Psychiatric Disease
Health impacts from infectious disease include new-onset psychiatric disorders. We will review historical (and current) epidemics, proposed mechanisms, and how vulnerability to mental illness is related to epidemics and the genetic imprint they left on the population.

Speakers
avatar for Emily Deans

Emily Deans

M.D.
Emily Deans MD is a psychiatrist practicing in Boston. She is the author of the blog, Evolutionary Psychiatry at Psychology Today, exploring the links between genes, environment, lifestyle, and mental health.


Saturday August 14, 2021 9:50am - 10:30am PDT
Luskin

10:30am PDT

Break: 30 minutes
Saturday August 14, 2021 10:30am - 11:00am PDT
Break

11:00am PDT

Optimizing Sleep and Breathing Hygiene in Earliest Childhood: Healthspan Implications
Deciduous Malocclusion (DM), defined by poorly developing jaws and misaligned teeth in preschool-age children (under the age of six years old), is a highly prevalent public health problem within industrialized societies. DM will seldom, if ever, self-correct and will usually persist and worsen into later adolescence and adulthood if left untreated; also, DM is frequently associated with sleep and respiratory problems. This presentation will develop an argument that orthodontic/dentofacial orthopedic expansion of poorly developing jaws in young children, can often coincide with optimization of sleep-related respiratory health in pediatric patients which can not only improve the QOL of affected children, but also might likely increase their life-spans, slow down rate of aging and accordingly increase their health-spans in their senior years.

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Boyd

Kevin Boyd

DDS, M.Sc.
Dr. Kevin Boyd is a board certified Pediatric Dentist in Chicago. He teaches in the Pediatric Dentistry residency program at Lurie Children's Hospital and serves as a dental consultant to their sleep medicine clinic. Dr. Boyd is a visiting scholar at the University of Pennsylvania... Read More →


Saturday August 14, 2021 11:00am - 11:40am PDT
Luskin

11:40am PDT

Break: 10 minutes
Saturday August 14, 2021 11:40am - 11:50am PDT
Break

11:50am PDT

Interactions between Sleep and Metabolism: does dietary mismatch affect us via sleep?
As humans, we share the general behaviour of sleep with other animals, but parameters such as duration and architecture vary widely among species in ways that are often not predictable phylogenetically. Trophic position, brain size, and degree of development at birth are factors known to influence these parameters. Within some species, sleep homeostasis, energy status, and thermoregulation are closely linked. In this talk we will explore characteristics of human sleep that seem to diverge from that of other animals, especially with respect to energy and metabolism, and consider how modern life may alter our health through its effects on sleep.

Speakers
avatar for L. Amber O'Hearn

L. Amber O'Hearn

M.Sc.
Amber O'Hearn has a diverse scientific background with publications in mathematics, theoretical computer science, linguistics, psychology, and more recently nutrition. Her current focus of study revolves around the role of nutrition in the development of the human brain.


Saturday August 14, 2021 11:50am - 12:30pm PDT
Luskin

12:30pm PDT

Lunch
Saturday August 14, 2021 12:30pm - 2:00pm PDT
Break

2:00pm PDT

Why Did We All Get Sick? The Nutritional Transition and How Seed Oils Drove It.
Speakers
avatar for Tucker Goodrich

Tucker Goodrich

Tucker Goodrich is a technology executive in the financial industry who designs, runs, and debugs complex systems in high-risk environments. Areas of expertise include risk management, systems management, and cyber-security.After experiencing some personal health crises and realizing... Read More →


Saturday August 14, 2021 2:00pm - 2:40pm PDT
Luskin

2:40pm PDT

Break: 10 minutes
Saturday August 14, 2021 2:40pm - 2:50pm PDT
Break

2:50pm PDT

The Resilient Brain: What Babies Can Teach Us About Long-term Brain Health
As the focus on age-related diseases increases, it is becoming clearer that the trajectories of brain aging and cognitive decline begin in utero and even pre-conception. At the same time, we are learning more about the factors needed for normal early brain development and resilience to injury. This talk will focus on how normal and pathological brain development in the fetal, neonatal, and childhood periods can help us understand what is required to maintain brain health across the lifespan as adults, maximise cognitive function as we age, and prevent age-related cognitive decline and dementia.

Speakers
avatar for Tommy Wood

Tommy Wood

M.D., Ph.D.
Dr. Tommy Wood is a Research Assistant Professor at the University of Washington. He studied biochemistry at Cambridge, received a medical degree from Oxford, and has a PhD in physiology and neuroscience from the University of Oslo. He is the President of Physicians for Ancestral... Read More →


Saturday August 14, 2021 2:50pm - 3:30pm PDT
Luskin

3:30pm PDT

Break: 10 minutes
Saturday August 14, 2021 3:30pm - 3:40pm PDT
Break

3:40pm PDT

Psychedelics: Gateway Drugs... to the Future of Medicine?
After decades of stigmatization, psychedelics are back in the spotlight as breakthrough therapies for trauma-related disorders and addiction. But their value lies in more than just reversing diagnoses: they also represent an entry point into a new paradigm for medicine. What can psychedelics teach us about the nature of trauma, healing, and the human mind, especially where conventional therapies have fallen short? How do we navigate subjective realms that fall outside the linear scope of science? And how can we invite the psychedelic state—with its unique ability to bring clarity and connection—into the broader landscape of human life, as we shift from an era of managing symptoms to an era of transforming their roots?

Speakers
avatar for Denise Minger

Denise Minger

Denise Minger is a health blogger, public speaker, nutrition consultant, and author of "Death By Food Pyramid"—a book that explores the shaky foundations of what we believe about food.


Saturday August 14, 2021 3:40pm - 4:20pm PDT
Luskin

4:20pm PDT

Break: 10 minutes
Saturday August 14, 2021 4:20pm - 4:30pm PDT
Break

4:30pm PDT

Closing Remarks
Saturday August 14, 2021 4:30pm - 4:40pm PDT
Luskin